Remembering the ‘Rescue at Los Baños’

Los-Banos-Raid copy

Los-Banos-Raid copy

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the 11th Airborne Division’s daring raid that freed more than 2000 prisoners of war from a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines. Bestselling author Bruce Henderson chronicles the mission in Rescue at Los Baños, a new book that reads like an adventure thriller and sheds new light on one of the most compelling stories of World War II.

General Douglas MacArthur personally authorized the rescue as Americans realized that desperate Japanese soldiers were becoming increasingly sadistic towards their civilian captives as they realized that Japan was losing the war. Henderson paints vivid portraits of the men and women involved in the story: prisoners, captors and rescuers. Check out the full cast of characters at Henderson’s website.

Henderson has written some excellent titles before: Hero Found is the best book about Vietnam-era U.S. Navy pilot Dieter Dengler. He also cowrote the #1 New York Times bestseller And the Sea Will Tell and Time Traveler, the inspirational memoir from noted physicist (and friend of UTR) Dr. Ronald L. Mallett. Rescue at Los Baños should be one of Henderson’s most successful books yet. It’s a compelling story well-told, generously illustrated and well-sourced. Anyone who enjoyed Lauren Hillenbrand’s Unbroken or Mitchell Zuckoff’s Lost in Shangri-La should check this one out.



  • Leo Johnson

    My Great Uncle Sgt.Edward. Paul Farek was a POW. in the Philippines at Camp O’Donald near Cabanatuan in Central Luzon. He told us how horribly the Japanese soldiers treated them.

  • conradswims

    This book should be a good read. “Ghost Soldiers” is another good read about Cabanatuan. The treatment of POW’s by the Japanese in the POW camps violated every norm. Up to and including having the POE’s dig their own grave and then throwing gasoline on them and burning them to death. Never Forget!

  • KenLand

    I am surprised anyone survived Japanese concentration camps since killing was a sport.